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Research

The stories below highlight diversity-related research by Stanford scholars, from a range of disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives. In addition to these stories, you can find more information about ongoing research and scholarship by exploring Stanford research centers and academic programs dedicated to advancing understanding of gender, race, ethnicity, religious identity and other dimensions of human diversity.

Oct 25 2016 | Stanford Health Policy | Posted In: In the News, Research
Stanford researchers have determined that more than 15 million children are living in high-mortality hotspots across 28 Sub-Saharan African countries, where death rates remain stubbornly high despite progress elsewhere within those countries. The study, published online Oct. 25 in The Lancet Global...
Oct 24 2016 | Stanford News | Posted In: Awards, Faculty, Research
José David Salvídar, professor of comparative literature, received the 2016 Jay B. Hubbell Medal for lifetime achievement, given out by the American Literature Society to scholars of American literary studies. The award was announced on Oct. 10 and will be presented to Saldívar at the 2017 Modern...
Oct 18 2016 | Stanford News | Posted In: Faculty, In the News, Research
Sociologist Corey D. Fields finds that some African-American Republicans see issues of race and racism as more of a problem in America than others. Despite being a relatively rare breed, African-American Republicans are diverse in their political thinking and reasons for being part of the GOP,...
Oct 12 2016 | Stanford GSB | Posted In: In the News, Research
Research shows why understanding the source of discrimination matters. If the United States is a melting pot for racial and ethnic diversity, the pot seems to be boiling over in this presidential election. Whether racism is on the rise, there is no question that attitudes toward racial and ethnic...
Sep 19 2016 | Stanford GSB | Posted In: In the News, Research, Students
Research shows a way to close a key achievement gap.   While many students experience difficulty acclimating to college, first-generation, low-income, and minority students are the hardest hit and most at risk of dropping out. Research suggests this achievement gap can be attributed, at...

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