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People Spotlights

CSRE students share their stories about race and ethnicity into their work and lives, and how they hope to bring about a more just world.
My interest in cross-culture, cross-community relations developed into a passion that has motivated my work at Stanford and continues to drive my commitment to improving Middle East-West relations in my career.
For more than a decade, she fought poverty and hardship to become the kind of teacher she wanted to be.
An artist, writer and aspiring architect explores her heritage.
CSRE students share their stories about race and ethnicity into their work and lives, and how they hope to bring about a more just world.
Hobbs considers her work to be “telling stories that need to be told,” even when the experiences described are “heartbreaking and ugly and painful.”
[My grandparents] sacrificed to send their children to school, and, consequently, my parents sacrificed to educate us kids.
"Turns out, the term 'mongolism' first rose to popularity in medical circles when John Langdon Down began categorizing patients as 'Mongolian idiots' and suggested that their condition, now known as Down syndrome, was somehow related to ethnic appearance. A hundred years after Down’s Observations on an Ethnic Classification of Idiots, the Mongolian delegation requested to the World Health Organization that 'mongol' be dropped from official medical use. "
CSRE students share their stories about race and ethnicity into their work and lives, and how they hope to bring about a more just world.
Reaching out to the Stanford community and receiving such a warm response has impacted my time at Stanford and my understanding of what is possible for students to accomplish.

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