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Imani Franklin

Imani Franklin

MEET IMANI

Imani (‘13), describes her passion for cross-community relations and involvement in a number of Stanford communities and centers, particularly the LGBTQ and Black communities. 

Immersing myself in the Black community, for the first time in my life I'm seen not as "the black kid" but as "Imani," which has greatly strengthened my confidence and sense of self.

I chose to attend Stanford not only for its diversity, but also for its institutional support for ethnic communities on campus. Immersing myself in the Black community, for the first time in my life I'm seen not as "the black kid" but as "Imani", which has greatly strengthened my confidence and sense of self.

I've felt a part of several communities at Stanford. I was a coordinator for Safe and Open Spaces at Stanford (SOSAS) through the LGBT Community Resource Center and loved becoming part of an affirming LGBT community. While co-president for Stanford's Black Student Union, I used my experience with SOSAS to initiate a similar program for race, called Student Outreach for Understanding Racial and Cultural Experiences (SOURCE). Working on the Associated Students of Stanford University (ASSU) Diversity Cabinet and coordinating of the Community Action Board sophomore year allowed me to see how the needs of the LGBTQ and Black communities overlapped with the needs of other minority communities on campus.

My interest in cross-culture, cross-community relations developed into a passion that has motivated my work at Stanford and continues to drive my commitment to improving Middle East-West relations in my career. For me, diversity is the safe coexistence of differences.

Imani Franklin, ‘13


STORY AND PHOTO COURTESY OF UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION