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Research

The stories below highlight diversity-related research by Stanford scholars, from a range of disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives. In addition to these stories, you can find more information about ongoing research and scholarship by exploring Stanford research centers and academic programs dedicated to advancing understanding of gender, race, ethnicity, religious identity and other dimensions of human diversity.

Mar 27 2017 | The Clayman Institute for Gender Research | Posted In: Faculty, In the News, Research, Staff
An overview of the Clayman Institute’s latest gender research presented at the Beyond Bias Summit
Mar 24 2017 | The Clayman Institute for Gender Research | Posted In: Faculty, In the News, Research, Staff
Research from Beyond Bias Summit Keynote Speaker Katherine W. Phillips reveals the connection Commitment to diversity does much more than benefit an organization's image. In fact, research suggests that organizations with more diversity have higher levels of innovation. For example, authors of one...
Mar 13 2017 | Stanford News | Posted In: Faculty, In the News, Research
Conventional computer chips aren’t up to the challenges posed by next-generation autonomous drones and medical implants. Now, Kwabena Boahen has laid out a way forward, using ideas built in to our brains.
Mar 10 2017 | The Clayman Institute for Gender Research | Posted In: Faculty, In the News, Research, Staff, Students
Two research projects by Shelley Correll and Sapna Cheryan examine gender inequity in tech and propose small-win solutions for sustainable change A recent forum organized by the Center for the Advanced Study of the Behavioral Sciences took an innovative view of barriers to women’s advancement in...
Mar 8 2017 | The Chronicle of Higher Education | Posted In: Faculty, In the News, Research
You might not know it from the promising talk of conversational computers, self-driving cars and lifelike human prosthetics, but computing is confronting a crisis. After decades of rapid acceleration, the speed of transistors — computerization’s fundamental building blocks — is hitting a wall.

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