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New research demonstrates how specific interventions can boost success of first generation and minority students in college

Three smiling students listen to a lecture

A paper in ‘Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences’ reports on benefits of certain remedies to close achievement gaps.

Image Credit: Stanford GSE
May 31 2016

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Faculty, Research, Students

A paper in ‘Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences’ reports on benefits of certain remedies to close achievement gaps.

Simple exercises to help incoming students understand the challenges that they would face in college substantially improved the success achieved by first generation and minority students, according to a new study from researchers affiliated with Stanford Graduate School of Education and other institutions.

The results add to the evidence that well designed psychological interventions could help close persistent achievement gaps occurring in higher education institutions nationwide. Students who are from lower income backgrounds, under-represented minority groups or families with no previous college graduates typically do worse than other students at the same schools. This gap can be attributed, in part, to negative stereotypes that may trouble such students about how members of their groups have historically been less successful in college than others.